Those Sexy Pomegranates

The Greeks credited pomegranate with aphrodisiac qualities and now modern science is discovering why.

New studies are showing a glass of pomegranate juice every day can increase men’s sex drive, ease erectile dysfunction and even increase sperm quality.

The purple-coloured fruit has more anti-oxidants than red wine, green tea or blueberries, and is known to have excellent anti-aging properties, with benefits for everything from wrinkle- free glowing skin to better heart and circulatory health.

But now the free radical action of the anti-oxidants is also proving a winner for improved sexual performance.

Pomegranates for Erectile Dysfunction

Nearly half of the men (47%) who drank a glass of pomegranate juice a day reported they got better erections, compared with only 32% in a placebo group, in an Los Angeles based randomised, placebo-controlled, double-blind, crossover pilot study.

Researchers from The Male Clinic, Beverly Hills, and University of California, Los Angeles said the findings are very encouraging as they suggest there is a non-invasive, non-drug way to potentially alleviate an issue that affects so many men.

“For men with ED, it is important to maintain a healthy diet and exercise. Drinking pomegranate juice daily could be an important addition to the diet in the management of this condition,” said co-author Harin Padma-Nathan from UCLA.

The results support an earlier study also showing the long-term consumption of pomegranate juice may help combat erectile dysfunction (Journal of Urology, July 2005).

Pomegranates for Increased Sex Drive

In another study, researchers asked 14 couples to perform a series of tasks after drinking pomegranate, orange or cranberry juice.

These included asking the couples to kiss and showed them images of scantily-clad models of the opposite sex. The team at Mindlabs International, at Sussex University, found the couples kissed more passionately after drinking pomegranate juice, sending their vital signs soaring. The effect was significantly more noticeable in the men.

Also Good for Hot Flushes

Pomegranate alleviates menopausal symptoms like hot flushes in mice and has been shown to reduce the risk of prostate cancer (Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Sept. 26, 2005).

It’s also been shown to help support the body’s natural defences against Alzheimer’s disease, various cancers, coronary and heart diseases, arthritis and other chronic illnesses. It reduces plaque in the arteries, and reduces “bad” and raises “good” cholesterol.

Other research reports suggest that pomegranate juice might help reduce the risk of breast cancer.

http://midliferocksblog.com/2009/08/06/pomegranate-juice-for-better-sex/

 

“Buddhism and Relationships” by Susan Piver

Four Noble Truths of Relationships

Relationships are deeply uncomfortable.

Whether it’s your first date or tenth anniversary, there is simply an enormous amount of discomfort involved in relationships. We’re afraid of being hurt, disappointed, overtaxed, ignored. The interesting part is that all these things happen. This is just the way it is, even in happy relationships.

The thing no one tells you is that it’s impossible to stabilize a relationship. Yes, I really mean those italics. Impossible. The emotional exchange between two people shifts like grains of sand in the desert: some days you can see forever and some days you just have to take cover because something kicked up out of nowhere and now shit is flying all over the place. You can’t see two feet in front of you and it stings. On still other occasions, imperceptible winds cause little piles to slowly accumulate until, one day, a familiar path is altogether blocked. You just can’t tell what’s going to happen. And just like hiking in the desert, you have to be as absorbed in the present moment as you are attuned to atmospheric indicators. Woe to she whose attention to either lapses.

The bad news is you never get to where you thought you were going. You get somewhere else instead. The good news is that there’s basically no way to have a boring relationship.

Discomfort comes from trying to make the relationship comfortable.

At the root of the discomfort is the wish that it wouldn’t be uncomfortable, that we could eventually find the “right” person and relax. But the truth is that when you do find the (or a) right person, it’s anything but relaxing: your neuroses, their neuroses, and all the hopes and fears you’ve ever had about love flood your situation. Whether you bargained for it or not, you get introduced to your deepest self while someone else is trying to introduce you to their deepest self. It can get very confusing. But instead of wasting time trying to make it not confusing, better to dive right in and be really nice to each other as you consider the root of your own and his/her confusion. (Acting nice to each other in the midst of confusion is love. Shhh.) (PS Acting nice doesn’t always mean being all sweet and demure. But I digress.)

It’s the inability to create safety that plots the path to love.

True love seems to exist on some mysterious edge of its own. It can’t be controlled and when you try, it calcifies. To keep it alive, at some point you just have to let go and see what happens.

When you work with all this nuttiness, love becomes more than mere romance. It turns into something way better: intimacy. Romance has got to end, that’s just the way the cookie crumbles. But intimacy? It has no end. You can’t be, “oh, intimacy, we’ve done that. What comes next?” Nothing comes next. That’s it. Discuss.

It is possible to work with the uncertainty skillfully.

Instead of flinging yourself kamikaze-like into the flame of love, you can train in working with the heat. As with anything you consider important (or life-threatening, for that matter), you don’t want to just show up and hope for the best. You want to play the odds.

via “Buddhism and Relationships” by Susan Piver | The Buddha | PBS.

The New Golden Age of Singledom

If the trend pieces and studies are to be believed, we’re living through a new golden age of the single person. Fewer Americans than ever are getting married, and they’re waiting longer and longer to do so. Many are living by themselves, often by choice. And yet, according to pop culture, a lot of them are awfully unhappy about it. In everything from “Girls” to Carly Rae Jepsen singles, our culture is obsessed with the prospect and possibility of finding a partner and escaping the lonely purgatory of singledom. Singleness, the message seems to be, is merely an unfulfilling wind-up for the far greater thrill of a real romantic relationship. But what would happen if we stopped hating on singledom, and started loving it?

In his new book, “Single: Arguments for the Uncoupled,” Michael Cobb, a professor of English at the University of Toronto, argues that our negative attitudes toward single people aren’t just hurting singles — they’re hurting our relationships and our culture. An academic work about music, film and literature, it claims that singles in North America have become a hated sexual minority, victims of our culture’s misplaced and out-of-step priorities. Cobb believes that single life can be as fulfilling, interesting and legitimate as any romantic arrangement, and that it’s high time we gave it more respect.

Salon spoke to Cobb over the phone from Toronto about the possibility of an unmarried president, “Girls” and what it’s like to be the spokesperson for singleness…

READ MORE via In defense of single people – Salon.com.

Love Times Infinity

Walk it OffSome cogs have clicked together recently in the slow and constant grind of gears in my head, and two converse ideas have formed:

Not all relationships which end, have failed.

Not all relationships which have failed, end.

To be honest, at first, I was only focused on the first idea. I wanted to write a post about how the ending of a relationship does not signal that it has failed. That some  (probably many, even most) relationships are not meant to last forever. That our irrational obsession with ensuring the longevity of a relationship despite massive sacrifices of happiness only exists because of the relationship-centered culture we are influenced by and the assurance that being in a long-term relationship is happiness, not that you should seek happiness from within yourself and hope to find someone awesome enough to appreciate that happiness as you do theirs.

Quite a mouthful, I agree…

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Male Codependence

Unhappy 1“Love is all you need.” For the person addicted to love, this becomes more than a popular lyric. It becomes literal truth. Love addiction is a psychological addiction, a result of unfulfilled childhood needs. Children whose needs remain unrecognized may adjust by learning to limit their expectations. This limitation process may take the form of core beliefs such as, “My needs don’t count,” “Getting close will hurt” and “I’m not lovable.” Such beliefs do not satisfy childhood needs, leaving them still to be met later in life. As adults, addictive lovers remain dependent upon others to care for them, protect them and solve their problems. Those with love addiction are characteristically familiar with desperate hopes and seemingly unending fears. Fearing rejection, pain, unfamiliar experiences, and having no faith in their ability–or even their right–to inspire love, they wait, wish, and hope for love, perhaps their least familiar experience. According to…

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Atomic Potential

relating and limitationLately I have had the wonderful opportunity to be faced with the obstacle of limitation. Many would think this is a bummer (it isn’t fun to be limited when it comes to relating with other people. But it serves a valuable opportunity to grow.) I’ve had the opportunity to see how it affects a relationship dynamic in which hinders the well being of pretty much any relationship.

From where I sit I see that when we go into relating with others we immediately try and put a label or box around others based on how we want them to be, what role to play in our lives etc. It’s nice and safe but it affects our ability to fully see how beautifully crafted a person is. It stops us from the full realization of what this person is capable of and the potential to share not only their love and…

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